yoke angle

yoke angle

drivert51

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Southern Illinois
Vehicle(s)
1972 CJ5, 304, 3 speed
I took the rear end off the old frame, ready to mount it to the new one. When I connect this thing back up, should the yoke be pointing straight ahead or angled toward the tranny?
 
what type of driveshaft are you planning to run? that will determine how its set up. a standard type driveshaft will have the yokes parallel with each other, a CV type shaft will need the yolk to point directly at the transfer case output.
I would wait to set your driveshaft angles until the drivetrain and body are mounted and settled on the suspension.
 
what type of driveshaft are you planning to run? that will determine how its set up. a standard type driveshaft will have the yokes parallel with each other, a CV type shaft will need the yolk to point directly at the transfer case output.
I would wait to set your driveshaft angles until the drivetrain and body are mounted and settled on the suspension.

I'll be using the stock one. the axle tubes have what i think are locator brackets on them and the yoke was angled slightly up but not pointing at the tranny
 
did the axle have any wedges installed between the springs and the spring perches? Is there a lift going on it? these are things that must be taken into consideration when setting the driveshaft angles.
 
did the axle have any wedges installed between the springs and the spring perches? Is there a lift going on it? these are things that must be taken into consideration when setting the driveshaft angles.

no wedges, i think the little bit of lift it has is from the aftermarket springs
 
Just to add illustration to what MyLittleCJ5 was saying.

If the U Joint angles on a drive shaft are not strait (they never are on an off road vehicle) then they actually speed up and slow down on each rotation. This can produce a bad vibration. But a drive shaft is made so the vibration of the front U Joint cancels the vibration of the rear U Joint. This works great if the the angle of the front U Joint to match the rear. This is how every manufacture makes vehicles.
degree2.gif
But this only works at small drive line angles. The UJoints don't like too much angle so when you lift your jeep you may have to angle the rear differential upward. This can be done with angled shims at the leaf springs. Then to keep both u Joint angles the same you can lower your TCase. If the drive line angles get to be too much you should then go to double cardan joint or a CV joint at the front of the drive shaft. A double cardan joint is 2 U Joints together.
0702_4wd_10_z+driveshaft_basics+new_driveshaft_installed.jpg

These 2 U Joints cancel each others vibrations. In that case the U Joint at the differential should not have any angle. To keep it from vibrating it should be strait like this.
degreecv.gif
Now you can see how the pinion is much higher than the manufacturer intended.
That vent reservoir is a good idea. Thanks for the tip.
 

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