Charcoal Canister on 1979's?

Charcoal Canister on 1979's?

Shazam

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1979 CJ-5 Renegade with '74 304 V8 & Edelbrock manifold & carb, Heddman headers & sidepipes, T-150 3 speed, Dana 20, Dana 30, AMC 20
Hi guys. I've decided to battle the smell of gas. Should a 1979 CJ5 with a 304 have one? If so, are there any picsas to where it should be? Many thanks!
 
No, a '79 didn't have and doesn't need a charcoal canister by law.
It wasn't until about 1984 that the emission laws kicked in and had a big impact of car performance. Before that (in the '60s and '70s). Car makers could do almost anything. They could get over 300 horses out of a 350ci. Then in the early to mid '80s cars took a nose dive in performance as the emission laws restricted the auto manufacturers. Now car makers know how to make a powerful engine with low emissions.
Although a '79 never had a canister I would think you could fit one. I'm not sure that would fix the gas smell. Could it be coming from the engine compartment, maybe the carb?
 
You are a wise man BusaDave. :notworthy: Thanks for all your help as I learn my new toy.

You are correct that I have another issue - the fuel return from the filter is capped off and leaking. I found the metal tube (also capped) and traced it to the tank. I'm on my way to get the required hose to route it properly.

Hopefully this will help the gas smell - but I also found a hose with a green tip under the master cylinder. I traced it back and consulted Chilton's...lo and behold it runs to the rollover check valve. Chilton's says the open end on mine should be on a charcoal canister?

Is there any other vent topper available to capture gas fumes? or should I just leave it open?

Sorry for being longwinded.
 
Don't forget to check all those 30 year old fuel lines:)
 
Don't forget to check all those 30 year old fuel lines:)

True that! :) But no leaks anywhere but the capped off return line. Thanks!
 
Lol that could have been fun....one of the ways the factory took care of those unwanted smells was to route it to the base of the carb or into the aircleaner so the engine would burn it off....if you buy another check valve (small white plastic 1 way vent) for your axles and shuff it on the end of your hose you will be set :chug:
 
Lol that could have been fun....one of the ways the factory took care of those unwanted smells was to route it to the base of the carb or into the aircleaner so the engine would burn it off....if you buy another check valve (small white plastic 1 way vent) for your axles and shuff it on the end of your hose you will be set :chug:
Sweet. Any idea where to get them? I've been to all the parts stores in town and searched the net - but I cannot find them. Thanks.
 
I have a charcoal canister on my '78. It's a I6 not a V8, I also had the factory smog equipment instaled too. It's tough to see in this picture, but it's under the power brake booster, behind the windshield washer tank, mounted right up on the firewall.

dsc_0021.jpg
 
I believe my 75 had some sort of canister in the rear of the left rear wheel well. Never had it hooked up, and never have had any problem with smell.
 
Your 1979 CJ came out of the box with a charcoal canister, which is why you have all of the plugged lines. I believe that the canister started with the smog pump and CAT, which first appeared in a CJ with the 1972 model year. In the early days of pollution controls, your GVW was the deciding factor as to CAT or no CAT so to speak and the line was drawn so heavier ½ ton pickups did not have to have it. As the CJ was listed as a ¼ ton truck smog control was required that year. (This is 49 State stuff, California was a head of the curve.) As time went on the smog gods kept lowering the GVW until they got us all.

Both the charcoal canister and the rollover check value are a hard critter to find and I think all but generic versions of each are no longer available so some adaptation is going to be necessary. I would try JC Whitney as they have long been the King of the weird and unusual parts.
 
Your right. Emission controls started in the '70s not the '80s.
The muscle car era of the '60s was stopped by the gas crisis and emission laws of the '70s.
Actually, and I might be going out on a limb here, but I think the '70s were the low point of US auto makers. Sure many CJ owners will disagree and I really like the corvettes of the '70s. But overall I think the cars of the '70s took a nose dive. That is when the foreign cars really started to sell. US cars were too big, had poor handling and used way too much gas with the quickly increasing gas prices. Japan already made small cars that got very good gas mileage and handled great.
 
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Your right. Emission controls started in the '70s not the '80s.
The muscle car era of the '60s was stopped by the gas crisis and emission laws of the '70s.
Actually, and I might be going out on a limb here, but I think the '70s were the low point of US auto makers. Sure many CJ owners will disagree and I really like the corvettes of the '70s. But overall I think the cars of the '70s took a nose dive. That is when the foreign cars really started to sell. US cars were too big, had poor handling and used way too much gas with the quickly increasing gas prices. Japan already made small cars that got very good gas mileage and handled great.

You are right. The 70's were the beginning of the end. Down tuning started in 1971. Impact bumpers in 1974. No more big blocks in vettes in 1974. No more convertibles in 1975. Feedback computers in 1981. Charcoal canisters started in 72 or 73, can't remember. Did I just tell on myself?
 
My '80 CJ7 with 304 had a seep where the gas tank fuel line enters the fuel pump. I was left with annoying gas fumes in the garage whenever I shut her down.

I tightened the fitting; the leak stopped, and so did the gas fumes. This one is hard to see, but I saw a dried, gummy run-down that lead me to the source.

Good luck!
 
Sorry, but the info on a 1979 is incorrect. My 79 California CJ 7 has a cannister with all the correct hoses from the roll over protection valves.
The 79 Jeep Service Manual has a section on the canister filter.
The Canister is located behind the Left Front Wheel Well next to the Firewall.
Also all 1979 Jeeps came with Air Pumps and Cats. The nice part is the air pump only blows into the exhaust manifold not the cat. Alot of money spent by Jeep on Emissions and Little in return.
 
I traced it back and consulted Chilton's...lo and behold it runs to the rollover check valve. Chilton's says the open end on mine should be on a charcoal canister?

Do yourself a favor a ditch the Chilton's -get a Jeep Factory manual for your year. Chilton's is too generic. I hate it when they say - "take it to your dealer . . " That's why I bought the darn manual to begin with, so I wouldn't have to take it to the dealer.
 
What I did on my 79' was eliminated the charcoal canister altogether. I used a fuel hose on the gas tank that ran what was the breathers for the canister to each other. Then eliminated the lines. You have to do this so fumes wont just air out to open lines. Simple fix to the canister issue that's penny's worth for a 4" piece of fuel line. Also I run only the distributor vacuum and PCV. Everything else is all worthless emissions garbage which has been blocked off with either rubber fittings or brass caps on the intake. As far as a chiltons, don't buy a new one and finding a dealer manual is hard to find and spendy! Go to eBay there is plenty of old chiltons for cheap those are the good ones. Mine is for 1945-1981 Jeeps and. Published in 1981 its a great manual to own. Think I just paid $4 with shipping. New service manuals are all worthless IMO. The old books are gold. All of my different books are 1980 or prior as they are of much higher quality and were designed with the do it your self Guy in mind.
 
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What I did on my 79' was eliminated the charcoal canister altogether. I used a fuel hose on the gas tank that ran what was the breathers for the canister to each other. Then eliminated the lines. You have to do this so fumes wont just air out to open lines. Simple fix to the canister issue that's penny's worth for a 4" piece of fuel line. Also I run only the distributor vacuum and PCV. Everything else is all worthless emissions garbage which has been blocked off with either rubber fittings or brass caps on the intake. As far as a chiltons, don't buy a new one and finding a dealer manual is hard to find and spendy! Go to eBay there is plenty of old chiltons for cheap those are the good ones. Mine is for 1945-1981 Jeeps and. Published in 1981 its a great manual to own. Think I just paid $4 with shipping. New service manuals are all worthless IMO. The old books are gold. All of my different books are 1980 or prior as they are of much higher quality and were designed with the do it your self Guy in mind.
Can you pass emissions with that setup? Mine is a daily driver. If not, is collector vehicle insurance expensive and/or a PITA?
 
Can you pass emissions with that setup? Mine is a daily driver. If not, is collector vehicle insurance expensive and/or a PITA?
In a word: no.
Emission laws vary state by state and even by city. Check your local laws but it they do a visual they will notice the canister missing.
 

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