D.I.Y. High Hood Tube Fender Build

D.I.Y. High Hood Tube Fender Build

mhubacek

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Location
Olympia, wa
Vehicle(s)
WR450F, 68' CJ-5, 72' CJ-5, F250 POWERSTROKE
Started putting my High Hood Tube Fenders together yesturday. The kit cost $350 through a local guy here in Olympia, WA. The kit came with all the brackets, tubes, and plates, bent and cut to fit my 72' CJ5. They came a little long, so cutting for a perfect fit is necessary. I also purchased the kit with the optional 3" tube flares. The rest of my photos weren't uploading right, but here is a pic of the old fenders off my CJ, and the parts laid out ready to test my novice metal working skills! :D
I'll try to get pics loaded tonight of the progress I've been making on it. Welding/Cutting tips gladly appreciated!



The pic of the wrangler is what the fenders should look like when completed. Also, if you didn't notice, the hood has to be cut, to allow for the height of the fenders.
 
are you going to notch the hood like the tj in the pic.?
 
Yes, I have to notch the hood for the fenders to fit. I'm going to use Hood Pins on top of the hood, since the section on the hood that normally holds the hood down will be cut. And I'm looking to get rid of that color, one piece at a time! The tube fenders will be black. Eventually, The jeep body will be smooth bedliner black.
 
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Sweet!! Ive been waiting for this thread. Cant wait to see them on a Cj with the hood notch. :drool:
 
Re: D.I.Y. High Hood Tube Fender Build-new pics

Here is the tube fenders being mocked up and measured. Lots of cutting, and recutting, and grinding, to make everything fit. I'm just tacking everything until everything fits just right.
First piece.

The cross tube was already knotched for me, so all I had to do, was cut the side that welds flush to the firewall. It looks slightly angled, but I sware I used a level!:confused:

I tacked this, then realized I can't drop the hood to see exactly where I need to cut the hood, so I'm going to have to take this back off, and drop the hood to trace where I need to cut.

Here is the tube fender flare. I had to knotch it with a grinder.:mad:
It took me at least an hour, and it's still not perfect. I think my 3" fender flares are now 2"!!:bang:


That's my day, I never thought working with tubing would be so hard. The guy that I bought them from was really helpful, and even came by to give me a little help. He told me he could measure, bend tube, weld, and install in half a day. This may take me a week or two.
 
New Pic

Didn't get too much accomplished today. I had to work. I did however, get the top plate off, and cut and welded the side steel panel on the fender. I'm sure having fun with this, and starting to understand the welding process a little better. :D Thanks for the help in my other thread, "Tube Knotching." :chug:
 
in that last pic it looks like you need another peice of tube to tack to to strenghten the top also rember to drill drain holes if there not there already
 
Essexmo, can you explain what you mean? Do you think I need a piece of tube to angle from the front bracket to the rear at the firewall? Thanks for the advice on drain holes. I was contemplating it. Sounds like you have some expertise in this area. Feel free to follow my thread, and let me know when something just don't look right! It would be much appreciated.
;) I'm a complete newbie to metal working, but I really enjoy it, and want to do it right.
 
Essexmo, can you explain what you mean? Do you think I need a piece of tube to angle from the front bracket to the rear at the firewall? Thanks for the advice on drain holes. I was contemplating it. Sounds like you have some expertise in this area. Feel free to follow my thread, and let me know when something just don't look right! It would be much appreciated.
;) I'm a complete newbie to metal working, but I really enjoy it, and want to do it right.
yes front bracket to the edge of the firewall is needed for strength then you can add it to the end of the top triangle middle of the fender tack the metal plates on it after as youre doing with 1 inch spaces after you can finish it alternating it so you dont warp the metal or use welder block its like plactercine and works as a heat sink welding shops should have it ehey do in england
 
I wouldn't drill drain holes. Why would you drill drain holes in a closed system? You would be asking for trouble. If you don't trust your welds enough to seal up the tube ends where mounted, smear some silicone around them. :chug:
 
I wouldn't drill drain holes. Why would you drill drain holes in a closed system? You would be asking for trouble. If you don't trust your welds enough to seal up the tube ends where mounted, smear some silicone around them. :chug:
and how would this stop condensation inside of the tubes :confused:
 
and how would this stop condensation inside of the tubes :confused:

Condensation would be the last thing I would worry about. Having holes drilled in tube, used especially for a fender, where it is subject to spray, mud, and/or water crossings, I would not want any of that getting inside of a tube I could not clean.

Just my .02
 
Condensation would be the last thing I would worry about. Having holes drilled in tube, used especially for a fender, where it is subject to spray, mud, and/or water crossings, I would not want any of that getting inside of a tube I could not clean.

Just my .02
for that you would have ruber plugs same as the body which you could drain when needed check any frame made out of steel or aluminum tube and you will find small drainholes
 
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The small drain holes are for the ecoat painting process most major manufactures use today for priming. Also a good place for rust to weep out of. If water gets in and mud plugs it, you'll have tons of moisture. Weld it tite. If it's sealed by weld, the heat from welding will drive out most moisture.
 
The small drain holes are for the ecoat painting process most major manufactures use today for priming. Also a good place for rust to weep out of. If water gets in and mud plugs it, you'll have tons of moisture. Weld it tite. If it's sealed by weld, the heat from welding will drive out most moisture.
the small holes are for moisture to drain out of the inside of the pipe is cool or cold a lot of the time due to the thickness of the steel therefor when the warm air hits the steel condensation will form

i still marvel at the people that rip of the vapor barrier put on the door by the factory and never fix or add a new 6 mil poly liner ?? Or the people that never check all there drain holes are clear every season ?? Or the people that never change all there fluids every two years brake.axel trans.ect or even grease and repack there bearings

As Jeep owners we know to do this and our vehicles will be on the roads and trails long after all their vehicles are in the scrap yards :D
 
mhubacek
I would say the big question here is just how water tight are your welds?
If this is one of your first fab jobs there may be a good possibility there will be ample drainage?? :chug:
It's your call Buba! "opinions are like ex wives, seems like everybody has at least one.":laugh:
 

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