Texas Chile

Texas Chile

essexmo

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Notes from an inexperienced Seattle chili taster named Frank who was visiting Texas:

"Recently I was honored to be selected as an Outstanding Famous Celebrity in Texas, to be a judge at a chili cook-off because no one else wanted to do it. Also the original person called in sick at the last minute and I happened to be standing there at the judges' table asking directions to the beer wagon when the call came in. I was assured by the other two judges (native Texans) that the chili wouldn't be all that spicy, and besides they told me I could have free beer during the tasting, so I accepted.

"Here are the score cards from the event:

Chili #1: Mike's Maniac Mobster Chili
JUDGE ONE: A little to heavy on the tomato. Amusing kick.
JUDGE TWO: Nice, smooth tomato flavor. Very mild.
FRANK: Holy smokes, what is this stuff? You could remove dried paint from your driveway with it. Took me two beers to put the flames out. Hope that's the worst one. These hicks are crazy.

Chili #2: Arthur's Afterburner Chili
JUDGE ONE: Smoky (barbecue?) with a hint of pork. Slight Jalapeno tang.
JUDGE TWO: Exciting barbecue flavor, needs more peppers to be taken seriously.
FRANK: Keep this out of reach of children! I'm not sure what I'm supposed to taste besides pain. I had to wave off two people who wanted to give me the Heimlich maneuver while I shoved my way to the front of the beer line.

Chili #3: Fred's Famous Burn Down the Barn Chili
JUDGE ONE: Excellent firehouse chili! Great kick! Needs more beans.
JUDGE TWO: A beanless chili, a bit salty, good use of red peppers.
FRANK: This has got to be a joke! Call the EPA, I've located a !?#@%~#@*_#! uranium spill! My nose feels like I have been sneezing Drano. Everyone knows the routine by now and got out of my way so I could make it to the beer wagon. Barmaid pounded me on the back; now my backbone is in the front part of my chest.

Chili #4: Bubba's Black Magic
JUDGE ONE: Black bean chili with almost no spice. Disappointing.
JUDGE TWO: Hint of lime in the black beans. Good side dish for fish or other mild foods, not much of a chili.
FRANK: I felt something scraping across my tongue, but was unable to taste it. Sally, the bar maid, was standing behind me with fresh refills so that I wouldn't have to dash over to see her.

Chili #5: Linda's Legal Lip Remover
JUDGE ONE: Meaty, strong chili. Cayenne peppers freshly ground adding considerable kick. Very impressive.
JUDGE TWO: Chili using shredded beef, could use more tomato. Must admit the cayenne peppers make a strong statement.
FRANK: My ears are ringing and I can no longer focus my eyes. I belched and four people in front of me needed paramedics. The contestant seemed hurt when I told her that her chili had given me brain damage. Sally saved my tongue by pouring beer directly on it from a pitcher. Sort of irritates me that one of the other judges asked me to stop screaming.

Chili #6: Vera's Very Vegetarian Variety
JUDGE ONE: Thin yet bold vegetarian variety chili. Good balance of spice and peppers. JUDGE TWO: The best yet. Aggressive use of peppers, onions, and garlic. Superb.
FRANK: My intestines are now a straight pipe filled with gaseous flames. No one seems inclined to stand behind me except Sally.

Chili #7: Susan's Screaming Sensation Chili
JUDGE ONE: A mediocre chili with too much reliance on canned peppers.
JUDGE TWO: Ho Hum, tastes as if the chef threw in canned chili peppers at the last moment. I should note that I am worried about judge #3, he appears to be in a bit of distress.
FRANK: You could put a hand grenade in my mouth and pull the pin and I wouldn't feel it. I've lost sight in one eye and the world sounds like it is made of rushing water. My clothes are covered with chili which slid unnoticed out of my mouth at some point. Good, at autopsy they'll know what killed me. I've decided to stop breathing, it's too painful and I'm not getting any oxygen anyway. If I need air I'll let it in through the hole in my stomach.

Chili #8: Helen's Mount Saint Chili
JUDGE ONE: This final entry is a good, balanced chili, neither mild nor hot. Sorry to see most of it was lost when Judge number 3 fell and pulled most of the pot on top of himself.
JUDGE TWO: A perfect ending, this is a nice blend chili, safe for all, not too bold but spicy enough to declare its existence.
FRANK: --------------
 
This is just the stuff they give tourists, the real Texas chili is pretty spicy.:cool:
 
Rodger that! "VIVA Terlingua!":punk:
Hey Horn! welcome back.
You know you need to update your profile, don't you??:madjeep:
I hope you can get it all on one page.:laugh::laugh:
 
I lived outside of houston for 5 years and the best part was the chilli and the tomallies.:drool: I really miss that. Ohio has no idea what good food is.
 
Hey Horn! welcome back.
You know you need to update your profile, don't you??:madjeep:
I hope you can get it all on one page.:laugh::laugh:


Thank You.:D
What's this profile thing of which you speak?:confused:
 
Last edited:
What's this profile thing of which you speak?:confused:

You have yours filled out, so no problem :)
and as IO said welcome back, we were wondering what happened to you.
 
You can't get a decent Italian sandwich or Pizza in Dallas and you can't get a decent bowl of chili in Boston, the world is not as small as you may have thought.:cool:
 
You have yours filled out, so no problem :)
and as IO said welcome back, we were wondering what happened to you.

Thank you, I had an unexpected paid vacation.;)
 
Thank You.:D
What's this profile thing of which you speak?:confused:
CJ asked that we list our mods in the profile with the vehicle list. Actually he said something about "mandatory" but I chose to change that word mentally to "requested". Talk to CJ he will fill you in better than I can or check your messages you may have something from him.
 
Any chance of a good Texas chilli resape a Bosten clam chowder one would be nice too :D
 
Any chance of a good Texas chilli resape a Bosten clam chowder one would be nice too :D

I see from what you drive you are a glutton for punishment, but "Texas Chilli Recipes." That's liable to start WW3.
Well against my better judgement here goes.
Let's start out with a "Famous Recipe"

Capitol Punishment Chili (World champion Texas red chili)

by Bill Pfeiffer

This recipe comes from Bill Pfeiffer. He won the 1980 and
1982 World Chili Cookoff and took first place in the
International Chili Society's 14th annual World Championship
Chili Cookoff with it.
Pfeiffer calls this recipe "Capitol Punishment Chili" because
he won his first attempt at a chili cookoff in Washington, DC.
Texas red chili has no beans...

INGREDIENTS (serves 25)
1 Tbsp oregano
2 Tbsp paprika
2 Tbsp MSG
9 Tbsp chili powder (light)
4 Tbsp cumin
4 Tbsp beef bouillon (instant crushed)
4 Tbsp cumin
2 cans beer
2 cups water
4 pounds extra lean chuck (ground for chili)
2 pounds extra lean pork (ground for chili)
1 pound extra lean chuck (cut into 1/4-inch cubes)
2 large onions, finely chopped
1/2 cup oil or kidney suet
1 tsp mole, powdered
1 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp coriander
1 tsp hot pepper sauce
8 oz tomato sauce (1 can)
1 Tbsp masa harina
salt, to taste

PROCEDURE
(1) In a large pot add paprika, oregano, MSG, chili powder,
cumin, beef bouillon, beer, and two cups of water. Let simmer.
(2) In a separate skillet brown 1 1/2 lb meat with 1 Tbsp oil
or kidney suet until meat is light brown.
(3) Drain and add to simmering spices.
(4) Continue until all meat has been added.
(5) Saute finely chopped onions and garlic in 1 Tbsp oil or
kidney suet.
(6) Add to spices and meat mixture. Add water as needed. Simmer
two hours.
(7) Add mole, sugar, coriander, Louisiana Red Hot sauce, and tomato
sauce. Simmer 45 minutes.
(8) Dissolve masa harina in warm water and add to chili. Add salt
to taste. Simmer 30 minutes.

NOTES
I use Durkee's Louisiana Red Hot sauce. Probably your favorite
brand of beer is ok. Pfeiffer's ICS-winning recipe uses Budweiser
because they sponsored the contest. For hotter chili, add additional
Louisiana Red Hot sauce to taste.
This chili is a great dish if you have a LOT of time. Note well
the amount of time called for in each simmering step.
 
I see from what you drive you are a glutton for punishment, but "Texas Chilli Recipes." That's liable to start WW3.
Well against my better judgement here goes.
Let's start out with a "Famous Recipe"

Capitol Punishment Chili (World champion Texas red chili)

by Bill Pfeiffer

This recipe comes from Bill Pfeiffer. He won the 1980 and
1982 World Chili Cookoff and took first place in the
International Chili Society's 14th annual World Championship
Chili Cookoff with it.
Pfeiffer calls this recipe "Capitol Punishment Chili" because
he won his first attempt at a chili cookoff in Washington, DC.
Texas red chili has no beans...

INGREDIENTS (serves 25)
1 Tbsp oregano
2 Tbsp paprika
2 Tbsp MSG
9 Tbsp chili powder (light)
4 Tbsp cumin
4 Tbsp beef bouillon (instant crushed)
4 Tbsp cumin
2 cans beer
2 cups water
4 pounds extra lean chuck (ground for chili)
2 pounds extra lean pork (ground for chili)
1 pound extra lean chuck (cut into 1/4-inch cubes)
2 large onions, finely chopped
1/2 cup oil or kidney suet
1 tsp mole, powdered
1 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp coriander
1 tsp hot pepper sauce
8 oz tomato sauce (1 can)
1 Tbsp masa harina
salt, to taste

PROCEDURE
(1) In a large pot add paprika, oregano, MSG, chili powder,
cumin, beef bouillon, beer, and two cups of water. Let simmer.
(2) In a separate skillet brown 1 1/2 lb meat with 1 Tbsp oil
or kidney suet until meat is light brown.
(3) Drain and add to simmering spices.
(4) Continue until all meat has been added.
(5) Saute finely chopped onions and garlic in 1 Tbsp oil or
kidney suet.
(6) Add to spices and meat mixture. Add water as needed. Simmer
two hours.
(7) Add mole, sugar, coriander, Louisiana Red Hot sauce, and tomato
sauce. Simmer 45 minutes.
(8) Dissolve masa harina in warm water and add to chili. Add salt
to taste. Simmer 30 minutes.

NOTES
I use Durkee's Louisiana Red Hot sauce. Probably your favorite
brand of beer is ok. Pfeiffer's ICS-winning recipe uses Budweiser
because they sponsored the contest. For hotter chili, add additional
Louisiana Red Hot sauce to taste.
This chili is a great dish if you have a LOT of time. Note well
the amount of time called for in each simmering step.
Cheers ill try this when i get the ingrediants i wonder if road kill can substitute for the meat also that 4tsp of cummin seems to be repeated and what is mole ?? :D
 
Last edited:
Cheers ill try this when i get the ingrediants i wonder if road kill can substitute for the meat also that 4tsp of cummin seems to be repeated and what is mole ?? :D

Yeah "Road Kill" is always good. We like to mark all the road kills on the way into town. That way on the way home we only pick up the freshest ones.

Mole is a mexican spice blend. Sorry about the cummin thing.;)
 
This ones from a "Famous Native Texan"

Don Henley's Texas Chili

This recipe along with Don's comments were taken from Rock and Roll Cuisine


The word "chili" (pronounced "chee-lee"), is an Aztec word, but the Spanish version
commonly used now is chile (pronounced "chee-lay"). Both words refer to the fruit of
the "Capsicum annuum" plant, which was, because of its piquancy, misnamed "pepper"
(after the black pepper-corn of the East Indies), by the Spanish explorers. This practice
of mislabeling things because the yare "like" other things has been going on for
centuries and is something that musicians, particularly, have come to know and abhor.
The labelers have given us such gems as "country rock", "jazz fusion" (melted jazz?),
"Dylanesque", "adult contemporary", "pop-rock", dance music", "punk", "post punk"
and my ltest favorite, "New Age" music. Who does this stuff? I don't know, but then I
don't know who names streets either. At any rate, there are roughly 200 different types
of chilies in the world and nobody knows the names of all of them. So, when we refer to
a dish as "chili", what we really mean is "chili (or chile), con carne"--chili peppers with
meat. Somewhere along the line, the "con carne" was dropped, additional spices were
added and the "chili" that we know today evolved. Unfortunately, this evolutionary
process also produced several aberrations which cannot be called anything but
hogslop. In fact, let's get one thing straight right now: True, authentic "chili" does not
--I repeat, NOT--have beans in it. Beans are a separate dish to be relished and revered in
their own right. When you put beans in chili, you insult bot the beans AND the chili.
Now, let's get on with it. Here's what you need to make real chili:

A case of beer (preferably Mexican beer, but American or a light German beer
will do). I prefer Corona, Bohemia or Superior.
4 pounds lean beef (I like to use a combination of 2 pounds coarsely ground
and 2 pounds cubed)
3 medium onions, chopped
3 or 4 tablespoons vegetable oil or olive oil
2 eight-ounce or 1 fifteen-ounce can tomato sauce--(NOT tomato paste). Whole
or chopped tomatoes will do if you can't find tomato sauce)
4 teaspoons salt
2 heaping teaspoons comino, also known as cumin, seeds or powder (it is best
to grind seeds in a mlcajete, i.e., a mortar and pestle)
6 or 8 cloves of fresh garlic, smashed or chopped
3 heaping teablespoons of chili powder (if you live in Europe, call up Gebhardt
Mexican foods Co. in San Antonio, Texas (512)227-0157 or the Pecos River
Spice Co., P.O. Box 1600. Corrales, New Mexico (they have a phone number in
New York for your convenience: (212) 628-5374, and tell them you need some
chili powder. If that fails, go to a Spanish market and see if you can buy some
dried, red Ancho or Anaheim chili peppers. (or try out the Online Chili Market.
Take the seeds out (please take the seeds out--and don't rub your eyes). Then,
grind, crush, chop or otherwise mutilate these peppers as best you can.)
2 level teaspoons paprika 2 level teaspoons cayenne pepper 2 fresh jalapeno
peppers (remove sees and chop--do not rub eyes) 4 level teaspoons oregano 1
level teaspoon groun coriander or 2 teaspoons chopped fresh cilantro (same
thing) 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce 2 or 3
heaping tablespoons masa (corn) flour. If you can't get corn flour, regular
wheat flour or ground yellow cornmeal will do.

Now, have a beer. If you have managed to round up all of the above ingredients, you deserve
one. It will also help to give you the correct "attitude" for making chili. In a large
skillet, saute the meat, onions and half the garlic in the oil until the meat is grey in
color. Then, dump the meat, onions and garlic into a large pot with the tomato sauce. Rinse
the tomato sauce cans with beer and pour it into the pot. Get yourself another beer. Spread
the meat evenly over the bottom of the pot. Add enough water so that the meat is covered by
1/2 inch. Add the remaining ingredients EXCEPT the four. (NOTE: The cayenne pepper is what
more or less determines the fieriness of the chili. If you want hotter chili, use more. If
you want milder chili, use less). Heat all ingredients to a mild boil, turn the flame down
IMMEDIATELY and simmer for at least one hour and 15 minutes, stirring occasionally to
prevent sticking. Skim off excess grease as it rises to the top. Mix the flour with warm
water to make a paste that is thick but pourable. Add this to the pot while stirring and
simmer for another 30 minutes--or another three hours--it just gets better. Have another
beer. Consider the above list of ingredients agian. Think about what a pain-in-the-A BAD WORD it
is to assmeble them. Go to the phone and call Caliente Chili, Inc., PO Drawer 5340, Austin,
Texas 78763. Phone (512)472-6996 and tell Gordon Fowler or any of the other nice folks down
there that you are in dire need of some Wick Fowler's 2-Alarm Chili "fixins" (that's
"ingredients" to you). They will in turn send you as many packets as you like of authentic,
all natural, pre-measured ingredients to which you only have to add the meat and the tomato
sauce (I like to throw in fresh onion and garlic, plus a little beer). This will enable you
to make a pot of chili every bit as good (if not better), than the above recipe with a
helluva-lot less trouble. And, no, I don't own part of the company, I just like the
product. It's good stuff. Have another beer.:chug:
 
what is mole ?? :D

You know thoes little critters that tear up your yard:laugh:

Heres another one for you, makes about 6 to 8 servings.

1 1/2 lb. round steak or venison cut into 1" cubes
3 cans of diced tomatoes
1 med white onion choped into small pieces
1 green peper choped into small pieces
3 cloves garlic diced
2 table spoons chili powder
1 tea spoon black pepper
1 tea spoon salt
1 tea spoon cumin
2 table spoons brown sugar
3-4 jalapeno peppers
1/2 tea spoon cayenne pepper
cook in crock pot on low for 12 hourrs
add 2 cans chili beans 2 hours before it's ready

enjoy, this does make it a little hot for some people.

This is great lets get some more recipes people :)
 
This ones from a "Famous Native Texan"

Don Henley's Texas Chili

This recipe along with Don's comments were taken from Rock and Roll Cuisine


The word "chili" (pronounced "chee-lee"), is an Aztec word, but the Spanish version
commonly used now is chile (pronounced "chee-lay"). Both words refer to the fruit of
the "Capsicum annuum" plant, which was, because of its piquancy, misnamed "pepper"
(after the black pepper-corn of the East Indies), by the Spanish explorers. This practice
of mislabeling things because the yare "like" other things has been going on for
centuries and is something that musicians, particularly, have come to know and abhor.
The labelers have given us such gems as "country rock", "jazz fusion" (melted jazz?),
"Dylanesque", "adult contemporary", "pop-rock", dance music", "punk", "post punk"
and my ltest favorite, "New Age" music. Who does this stuff? I don't know, but then I
don't know who names streets either. At any rate, there are roughly 200 different types
of chilies in the world and nobody knows the names of all of them. So, when we refer to
a dish as "chili", what we really mean is "chili (or chile), con carne"--chili peppers with
meat. Somewhere along the line, the "con carne" was dropped, additional spices were
added and the "chili" that we know today evolved. Unfortunately, this evolutionary
process also produced several aberrations which cannot be called anything but
hogslop. In fact, let's get one thing straight right now: True, authentic "chili" does not
--I repeat, NOT--have beans in it. Beans are a separate dish to be relished and revered in
their own right. When you put beans in chili, you insult bot the beans AND the chili.
Now, let's get on with it. Here's what you need to make real chili:

A case of beer (preferably Mexican beer, but American or a light German beer
will do). I prefer Corona, Bohemia or Superior.
4 pounds lean beef (I like to use a combination of 2 pounds coarsely ground
and 2 pounds cubed)
3 medium onions, chopped
3 or 4 tablespoons vegetable oil or olive oil
2 eight-ounce or 1 fifteen-ounce can tomato sauce--(NOT tomato paste). Whole
or chopped tomatoes will do if you can't find tomato sauce)
4 teaspoons salt
2 heaping teaspoons comino, also known as cumin, seeds or powder (it is best
to grind seeds in a mlcajete, i.e., a mortar and pestle)
6 or 8 cloves of fresh garlic, smashed or chopped
3 heaping teablespoons of chili powder (if you live in Europe, call up Gebhardt
Mexican foods Co. in San Antonio, Texas (512)227-0157 or the Pecos River
Spice Co., P.O. Box 1600. Corrales, New Mexico (they have a phone number in
New York for your convenience: (212) 628-5374, and tell them you need some
chili powder. If that fails, go to a Spanish market and see if you can buy some
dried, red Ancho or Anaheim chili peppers. (or try out the Online Chili Market.
Take the seeds out (please take the seeds out--and don't rub your eyes). Then,
grind, crush, chop or otherwise mutilate these peppers as best you can.)
2 level teaspoons paprika 2 level teaspoons cayenne pepper 2 fresh jalapeno
peppers (remove sees and chop--do not rub eyes) 4 level teaspoons oregano 1
level teaspoon groun coriander or 2 teaspoons chopped fresh cilantro (same
thing) 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce 2 or 3
heaping tablespoons masa (corn) flour. If you can't get corn flour, regular
wheat flour or ground yellow cornmeal will do.

Now, have a beer. If you have managed to round up all of the above ingredients, you deserve
one. It will also help to give you the correct "attitude" for making chili. In a large
skillet, saute the meat, onions and half the garlic in the oil until the meat is grey in
color. Then, dump the meat, onions and garlic into a large pot with the tomato sauce. Rinse
the tomato sauce cans with beer and pour it into the pot. Get yourself another beer. Spread
the meat evenly over the bottom of the pot. Add enough water so that the meat is covered by
1/2 inch. Add the remaining ingredients EXCEPT the four. (NOTE: The cayenne pepper is what
more or less determines the fieriness of the chili. If you want hotter chili, use more. If
you want milder chili, use less). Heat all ingredients to a mild boil, turn the flame down
IMMEDIATELY and simmer for at least one hour and 15 minutes, stirring occasionally to
prevent sticking. Skim off excess grease as it rises to the top. Mix the flour with warm
water to make a paste that is thick but pourable. Add this to the pot while stirring and
simmer for another 30 minutes--or another three hours--it just gets better. Have another
beer. Consider the above list of ingredients agian. Think about what a pain-in-the-A BAD WORD it
is to assmeble them. Go to the phone and call Caliente Chili, Inc., PO Drawer 5340, Austin,
Texas 78763. Phone (512)472-6996 and tell Gordon Fowler or any of the other nice folks down
there that you are in dire need of some Wick Fowler's 2-Alarm Chili "fixins" (that's
"ingredients" to you). They will in turn send you as many packets as you like of authentic,
all natural, pre-measured ingredients to which you only have to add the meat and the tomato
sauce (I like to throw in fresh onion and garlic, plus a little beer). This will enable you
to make a pot of chili every bit as good (if not better), than the above recipe with a
helluva-lot less trouble. And, no, I don't own part of the company, I just like the
product. It's good stuff. Have another beer.:chug:
id have to use american beer the beer in Canada is almost 40 dollars a case i have a still its a mk2 version parts of the mk1 may still be in orbit i was hoping America diddnt go to Defcon 1 as Canada doesnt have WMDs just lots of stills :D
 
Here's another

Classic Texas Chili

Serving Size : 10


Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
5 Pounds Chuck Roast -- boned
8 Ounces Beef Suet -- chopped
8 Cloves Garlic
3 Teaspoons Sea Salt
2 Teaspoon Black Pepper -- ground
6 Tablespoons Cayenne Peppers -- ground
6 Tablespoons Chili Arbol -- ground
8 Tablespoons Masa Harina
2 Tablespoons cummin
4 Shiner Bock bottles
2 Tablespoons Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar
2 Teaspoons Beef Base
Red Chili Peppers (To Taste) -- chopped

Render the suet and discard the solids. Cut the meat unto 1/2" chunks or
grind coarsely. Add to the hot fat and brown. Add the garlic, salt,
pepper
and chili powder.Mix well and allow the spices to permeate the meat. Add
the masa harina and stir in well to blend. Add the beer, vinegar, beef
base and the extra chilies. (You may substitute beef broth for 1/2 the beer
and beef base, to reduce the sodium). Allow to simmer until the meat
begins
to disintegrate. Cool to room temperature and refrigerate. Remove
hardened
grease from the top, if any collects. Reheat and serve with a side of
pinto
beans, minced white onion for a garnish. Also serve tortillas, tortilla
chips, corn bread or saltine crackers as a bread.
 
Thanks longhorn and old dog i love hot food ill just have to stock up on the bog roll lol :D
 
I lived outside of houston for 5 years and the best part was the chilli and the tomallies.:drool: I really miss that. Ohio has no idea what good food is.

What are you talking about we have Skyline and Gold Star :laugh:
 

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